Peter F. Rovito, M.D., F.A.C.S.
General and Laparoscopic Surgery
HomeGeneral InfoGeneral/LapCancerBariatricTrainingHonorsPublicationsPatient Testimonials

Oncologic (Cancer) Surgery

Dr. Rovito performs a wide range of oncologic procedures to control or cure cancer. Advances in surgery, radiation techniques and chemotherapy have vastly improved the prognosis for many forms of cancer for which there was previously little hope.

Dr. Rovito will work closely with your oncologist, radiation oncologist and other doctors involved in your care in the management of this disease.

Information on specific procedures is provided by a variety of respected sources, including the Journal of the American Medical Association, the American Cancer Society and the National Institutes for Health.

Information and links presented here are for your information only and should never take the place of consultation with a qualified medical professional.

Oncologic Surgery Performed:

Breast
Thyroid 
and Gastrointestinal procedures,
including: 
Parathyroid
Esophogeal 
Sarcoma
Stomach
Small intestine
Colon/rectal
Pancreas
Liver

CANCER: The Basics
Cancer is any of a group of diseases characterized by an uncontrolled, abnormal growth of cells that can spread throughout the body. Cancer is thought to develop from a single cell or a small set of cells after changes have occurred in their DNA, the genetic material that instructs cells how to behave. Cancer cells cause harm in several different ways. For more information from the American Medical Association, click on this link:

Cancer - the Basics

Cancer: How is it Treated?
Following are some common cancer treatments:
Surgery
Radiation
Chemotherapy
Biological response modifiers
Hormone therapy
Photodynamic therapy
Bone marrow transplant

For more information from the American Cancer Society, click on the link below:

How is Cancer Treated?



Preventing Cancer:
Some risk factors for cancer can be modified...finding out about family history and genetic risks for cancer can help with early detection and better treatment.
Stop Smoking
Eat a Healthful Diet
Eat at least five servings of fruit and vegetables every day.
Use Alcohol Only in Moderation
Avoid Exposure to Ultraviolet Rays
Exercise Every Day
Recognize Occupational and Environmental Hazards
For more information from the Journal of the American Medical Association, click on the link below:

Preventing Cancer


Breast Cancer:
Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in this country (other than skin cancer). The number of new cases of breast cancer in women was estimated to be about 212,600 in 2003. This article has important information about breast cancer. It discusses possible causes, screening, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and recovery. It also has information to help women with breast cancer cope with the disease. For more information from the 
National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes for Health, click on this link:

Breast Cancer

Thyroid Cancer:
This article has important information about cancer of the thyroid. Each year in the United States, thyroid cancer is diagnosed in 14,900 women and 4,600 men. This article discusses possible causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up care. It also has information to help patients cope with thyroid cancer. Research is increasing what we know about thyroid cancer. For more information from the 
National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) click here:

Thyroid Cancer


Parathyroid Surgery:
Since 1925, the standard treatment for parathyroid disease (primary hyperparathyroidism) has been to surgically remove the parathyroid gland (or glands) which are overproducing parathyroid hormone. Remember, this is a hormone problem, so the goal is to remove the source of the excess parathyroid hormone (remove the bad parathyroid gland, leave the normal parathyroid glands). For more information from Parathyroid.com, click on the link below:

Parathyroid Surgery

Cancer of the Esophagus:
The diagnosis of cancer of the esophagus brings with it many questions and a need for clear, understandable answers. We hope this article will help. It provides information about the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of cancer of the esophagus, and it describes some of the possible causes (risk factors) of this disease. For more information from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes for Health (NIH), click here:

Cancer of the Esophagus


Stomach Cancer:
In the United States, more than 20,000 individuals are diagnosed with gastric (stomach) cancer each year. Men are more likely to have stomach cancer than women are. Stomach cancer usually affects persons who are older than 55 years, although it may occur at younger ages. Because stomach cancer may occur without symptoms, it may be in advanced stages by the time the diagnosis is made. Stomach cancer can metastasize (spread) to other organs of the body. For more information from the 
National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes for Health (NIH), click here:

Stomach Cancer


Cancer of the Colon and Rectum:
The diagnosis of cancer of the colon or rectum, also called colorectal cancer, raises many questions and a need for clear, understandable answers. Together, cancers of the colon and rectum are among the most common cancers in the United States. They occur in both men and women and are most often found among people who are over the age of 50. Cancer research has led to real progress against colorectal cancer — a lower chance of death and an improved quality of life for people with this disease. For more information from the NIH, click here:

Colorectal Cancer


Cancer of the Pancreas:
In the United States, cancer of the pancreas is diagnosed in more than 29,000 people every year. It is the fifth leading cause of cancer death. This article discusses possible causes of cancer of the pancreas. It also describes symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up care. Scientists are studying cancer of the pancreas to learn more about this disease. They are finding out more about its causes. Doctors are exploring new ways to treat it. Research already has led to better quality of life for people with cancer of the pancreas. For more information from the National Cancer Institute at the NIH, click here:

Cancer of the Pancreas

Overview: Liver Cancer:
The liver is the largest internal organ in the body. The liver processes and stores many of the nutrients absorbed from the intestine. It also makes some of the clotting factors needed to stop bleeding. And it secretes bile into the intestine to help absorb nutrients. The liver also plays an important part in removing toxic wastes from the body. Because the liver is made up of several different types of cells, several types of tumors can form in the liver. Some of these are cancerous and some are benign (not cancerous). For more information from the American Cancer Society, click here:

Liver Cancer